OLED (I2C) With ATtiny85

NOTE: Prior pushing through with this article, I advised you to read and visit my article Miniaturizing Your Arduino Projects Using ATtiny85 if you haven’t yet. In this article, you will learn how to set up your ATtiny85 so that it would be ready to be uploaded with sketches through an ISP. In one of my previous posts (LCD Display with ATtiny85), I detailed how LCD is used with an ATtiny85, or in my case the ATtiny85 Development Board. I tried the usual libraries which I use for my OLED with my Arduino boards (Uno, Pro Mini, Nano and Atmega328-based DIY … Continue reading OLED (I2C) With ATtiny85

LCD (I2C) with ATtiny85

NOTE: Prior pushing through with this tutorial, I encourage you  (if you haven’t yet) to visit Miniaturizing Your Arduino Project using ATtiny85, which demonstrates how to set up your ATtiny85 with Arduino UNO and Arduio IDE. I am a bit into programming the ATtiny85 currently, and was looking for some libraries to use for my 16×2 LCD via i2c. I tried testing the current library I had (refer to my previous tutorial : Displaying Text to LCD via I2C Module on DIY Arduino Board), but this does not work with the ATtiny85. By the way, I am using the ATtin85 … Continue reading LCD (I2C) with ATtiny85

Miniaturizing Your Arduino Project using ATtiny85

I am currently creating an “Arc Reactor” similar to that of Tony Stark’s. And I initially created a prototype using my DIY Arduino-compatible on breadboard. Then I decided to use an Arduino-compatible Arduino Nano V3. Refer to the images below: Through some researches I did online on how to minimize components use, I stumbled with using an ATtiny85 chip to be used in the project. And through some more researching, I decided to have the “Arc Reactor” project done using the ATtiny85 Development Board, picture below: I bought these boards from DJ Elektronix (transaction was fast, and the items were … Continue reading Miniaturizing Your Arduino Project using ATtiny85

Displaying Time using OLED And Real Time Clock Modules

The modules needed for this setup are the following: Arduino UNO (or any Arduino board) Real Time Clock (RTC) DS1302 Module OLED (I use the 0.96 128×64 i2c module Let’s take a look at this RTC Module’s pinout: VCC – connects to Arduino’s VCC GND – connects to Arduino’s GND CLK – connects to Arduino’s Digital Pin 6 DAT – connects to Arduino’s Digital Pin 7 RST – connects to Arduino’s Digital Pin 8 The OLED’s pinouts are the following. Usually when a module is using i2c, it will have four (4) pins: GND – connects to Arduino’s GND VCC … Continue reading Displaying Time using OLED And Real Time Clock Modules

Using Distance Sensor in Arduino (HC-SR04)

There is a component which can be used to measure distances by emitting ultrasonic wave to an object and calculating the time it takes for the echo to come back (from the time the sensor emitted the ultrasonic wave. Generally, the echo goes back to the sensor at two times the distance (First distance is from the sensor to the object, second distance is from the object back to the sensor). The speed of sound is calculated at 343 meters / second. If you recall your Physics class in intermediate school (or even college), you know that: velocity (v) = … Continue reading Using Distance Sensor in Arduino (HC-SR04)

DIY Flex Sensor (Bend Sensor)

I have been receiving requests regarding the DIY Flex Sensor (Bend Sensor) that I used on my Robotic Hand project. Well, here it is. Materials needed: Two (2) flexible plastic strips (2cm x 10cm) Two (2) aluminum foil strips (1cm x 9cm) One (1) bond paper strip (2cm x 10cm) One (1) sharpened pencil One (1) 10K-ohm resistor Four (4) jumper wires STEP 1. Prepare the white bond paper strip (2cm x 10cm) and the pencil. Darken the both sides of the bond paper strip with the pencil – as black as possible. See images below for reference: STEP 2. Prepare … Continue reading DIY Flex Sensor (Bend Sensor)

Rectangular Trimpot on Breadboard

I decided to create an article regarding this type of potentiometer: multi-turn rectangular potentiometer, which is similar to what is shown below: As you can see in the image above, you see number 3, 2, and 1. The lead below 1 is for VCC (+5V), lead below 2 is for Signal (usually an analog pin in the Arduino board), and the lead below 3 is for GND. The red jumper wire is connected to the lead below 1. The blue jumper wire is connected to lead below 2, and the green jumper wire is connected to lead below 3. Please refer to the image … Continue reading Rectangular Trimpot on Breadboard